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Did You Know How to Calculate Z Score in R?

Need to learn how to find and calculate z scores in R? This guide provides a step-by-step walkthrough of computing z-score in rstudio.

Z-scores, also known as standard scores, z-values, normal scores, z score or standardized values, measure how many standard deviations away a value is from the mean of a distribution. They are useful for comparing data with different units, scales, or ranges. They can also help us test a dataset's normality, find outliers, and calculate probabilities.

Did You Know How to Calculate Z Score in R

In this article, I will show you how to calculate z-scores for a single column or every column in a data frame using R. I will also explain what z-scores mean and how to interpret them. I will use two examples to illustrate the process and the results. 

What is a Z-Score and How to Calculate It?

It tells you how far a value is from the mean of a distribution in terms of standard deviations. It is calculated by subtracting the mean from the value and dividing by the standard deviation. The formula for calculating a z-score is:

z=(x−μ)/σ​
where:
z is the z-score
x is the value
μ is the mean
σ is the standard deviation

For example, suppose we have a dataset of exam scores that appears to be normally distributed with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10. We can calculate the z-score for a score of 75 using the formula:

=(75−50)10
=2.5

It means that a score of 75 is 2.5 standard deviations above the mean. We can also calculate the probability of getting a score of 75 or higher using the standard normal distribution table or the pnorm function in R:

pnorm(2.5, lower.tail = FALSE)
# [1] 0.006209665
standard normal distribution table or the pnorm function in R

Only about 0.6% of the scores are 75 or higher. A score of 75 is very high and rare in this distribution.

How to Calculate Z-Scores for a Single Column in R?

We can use the scale function to calculate z-scores for a single column in R. The scale function standardizes a vector or a matrix by subtracting the mean and dividing by the standard deviation. It returns a numeric vector or matrix with the same dimensions as the input.

For example, suppose we have a data frame called df with two columns: x and y. We can calculate the z-scores for the x column using the scale function:

df <- data.frame(x = c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5), y = c(10, 20, 30, 40, 50))
scale(df$x)

#            [,1]

# [1,] -1.2649111
# [2,] -0.6324555
# [3,]  0.0000000
# [4,]  0.6324555
# [5,]  1.2649111

The scale function returns a matrix with one column and five rows. Each row corresponds to the z-score of each value in the x column. For example, the first value in the x column is 1, which has a z-score of -1.2649111. This means that it is 1.2649111 standard deviations below the mean value of its column.

We can also assign the result to a new variable or add it as a new column to our dataframe:

z_scores <- scale(df$x)
df$z_scores <- scale(df$x)
df
Calculate Z-Scores for a Single Column in R

How to Calculate Z-Scores for Every Column in R?

To calculate z-scores for every column in R, we can also use the scale function, but this time, we apply it to the whole data frame instead of a single column:
scale(df)
Calculate Z-Scores for Every Column in R

The scale function returns a matrix with three columns and five rows. Each column corresponds to the z-scores of each column in the original dataframe. For example, the first column is the z-scores of the x column, the second is the z-scores of the y column, and the third is the z-scores of the z_scores column.

We can also assign the result to a new variable or overwrite our original dataframe:

z_scores <- scale(df)
df <- scale(df)
df
Calculate Z-Scores for Every Column in R

Conclusion

In this article, I have shown you how to calculate z-scores for a single column or every column in a data frame using R. I have also explained what z-scores mean and how to interpret them. 
  • A z-score tells you how many standard deviations away a value is from the mean of a distribution.
  • A z-score is calculated by subtracting the mean from the value and dividing by the standard deviation.
  • A z-score can help us compare data with different units, scales, or ranges.
  • A z-score can also help us test a dataset's normality, find outliers, and calculate probabilities.

We can use the scale function to calculate z-scores for a single column in R and pass it the column's name. To calculate z-scores for every column in R, we can use the scale function and pass it the data frame's name.

The scale function returns a numeric vector or matrix with the same dimensions as the input.

We can assign the result to a new variable or add it as a new column to our data frame.

I hope you have found this article helpful and informative. If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below or contact me at info@rstudiodatalab.com. You can also visit our website for more R tutorials and tips.

To learn more about R programming and data analysis, check out our online courses and order our services at https://www.rstudiodatalab.com/p/order-now.html.

Frequently Asked Questions (Faqs)

What is the difference between a z-score and a t-score?

A z-score is based on the standard normal distribution, with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation of 1. A t-score is based on the t-distribution, which has a mean of 0 but a different standard deviation depending on the degrees of freedom. A t-score is used when the sample size is small, or the population standard deviation is unknown.

How can I calculate z-scores for multiple variables in R?

You can use the scale function and pass it to a matrix or a data frame that contains multiple variables. The scale function will return a matrix or a data frame with the same dimensions as the input but with standardized values for each variable. 

How can I handle missing values when calculating z-scores in R?

You can use the na.rm argument in the scale function to remove missing values before calculating z-scores. For example, scale(df, na.rm = TRUE) will calculate z-scores for df after removing any NA values.

How can I plot z-scores in R?

You can use the hist function to plot a histogram of z-scores. You can also use the qqnorm and qqline functions to plot a normal Q-Q plot of z-scores. 

How can I interpret z-scores in R?

You can interpret z-scores in R by comparing them to the standard normal distribution. A z-score of 0 means that the value is equal to the mean of the distribution. A positive z-score means the value is above the mean, and a negative z-score means the value is below the mean. The magnitude of the z-score tells you how many standard deviations away the value is from the mean. For example, a z-score of 1.96 means that the value is 1.96 standard deviations above the mean, corresponding to the 97.5th percentile of the distribution. You can use the pnorm function to calculate the probability or percentile of a z-score in R. For example, pnorm(1.96) will return 0.975, which means that 97.5% of the values are below 1.96 standard deviations from the mean.

About the Author

Ph.D. Scholar | Certified Data Analyst | Blogger | Completed 5000+ data projects | Passionate about unravelling insights through data.

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